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g3H2O
Regular Member
Username: g3h2o

Post Number: 298
Registered: 08-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:17 am:       

The only thing preventing me from getting a 125 right now is that the only place I can put it has uneven tile that is not level either.

Each piece of tile is textured and has high and low spots on it, and to make matters worse some tiles were set higher than others, resulting in a poor surface for evenly supporting weight.

What can I do, short of ripping the tile out in the area the stand would occupy, to ensure the stand is on firm ground all the way around?

I had thought of pounding cedar shims under the stand and then chiseling off whatever sticks out, but I wouldn't be able to reach the backside against the wall.

Currently my 75 is on the same floor, and I only have the 4 corners of the stand shimmed to make it level. I'm starting to worry that eventually I'm going to have a major problem, as there are gaps all around the base of the stand.

Any brilliant ideas?
- Mike in Arizona
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dan
Moderator
Username: dan

Post Number: 6787
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 08:19 am:       

ideas but perhaps not 'brilliant'. shim as you're doing and not worry about whatever sticks out against the wall. use 1x6 under stand and shim those. as long as 4 corners are on sturdy, even support you should be fine.
you're never too old to have a happy childhood.
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compensate
Regular Member
Username: compensate

Post Number: 168
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 08:44 am:       

What about putting down some type of "cushy" mat or material on the floor, like heavy-duty styrofoam, or a piece of wet-suit material? Maybe there's a better material to support such heavy weight that these two. That should equalize the surface pressure.

I put styrofoam between my aquarium and the stand to account for slight surface irregularities - seems like this theory should work for uneven floor surfaces, too.
What is popular isn't always right, and what is right isn't always popular!
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g3H2O
Regular Member
Username: g3h2o

Post Number: 300
Registered: 08-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:25 pm:       

Hmm, interesting. Anyone have any thoughts on what Compensate mentioned? Would a rubber mat of some sort or alternate cushioning be adviseable?

I know the tank needs to be level and supported equally by the stand, so I assumed the stand needed to be receiving the same support on the flooring.

Dan, over time won't the weight of the tank cause a bowing or warping of the stand to some extent if there are gaps between it and the floor?

Thanks for your inputs, I'm still learning :-)
- Mike in Arizona
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sully
Ancient Plus
Username: sully

Post Number: 8581
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:31 pm:       

i would go dan's route. a tapered shim (novel items those shims--there is a reason they are not called blocks--lol) is a great thing. It is skinny at one end. Fat at the other. Does not really leave you with gaps at the base and the floor to worry about.

cushy materials settle. then you get stuck with an uneven tank down the road. that gets difficult to rectify. all that water, all the pretty aquascaping that needs to get ripped out, trying to figure out what to do with the fish when you are re-leveling the tank. man, it is a drag.

do it right the first time--don't go the easy route--and you will be much happier in the long run.
"I usually read the obituaries first. There is always the happy chance that one of them will make my day." -- Richard Ames
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dan
Moderator
Username: dan

Post Number: 6789
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 01:43 pm:       

'cushy' materials tend to flatten out in time with the weight of tank and stand and then you've got an unbalanced condition again. i'd go with something 'solid'.
you're never too old to have a happy childhood.
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g3H2O
Regular Member
Username: g3h2o

Post Number: 302
Registered: 08-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:28 pm:       

Dan, does that apply also to material between the tank and stand then?

I read a lot about people putting a layer of thin styrofoam under the bottom of the tank. There was even a thread on it a month or two ago.

Just trying to learn and do this right :-) Thanks for bearing with me.
- Mike in Arizona
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Michael R. Monroe
Advanced Member
Username: mrmonroe

Post Number: 1218
Registered: 09-2004
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 02:53 pm:       

With my tanks on the desk and the dresser I do have a heavy duty styrofoam under them. This is more to absorb some of the vibrations from drawers and cabinets being opened and closed. No scientific evidence but before I switched my tanks around I did not have padding under the tank on my dresser. THe phone sat there too and whenever the phone rang the fish jumped. After switching stuff around about a year ago I had padding under the tanks. The fish no longer jump when the phone rings.

However I do not have any foam for my 75 on an independant stand.
HTH
The following statement is true. The previous statement was false.
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larry
Regular Member
Username: gomezaddams

Post Number: 906
Registered: 05-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 03:18 pm:       

I think if you shimmed the stand level it would be fine,I would use extra shims all along the base.What kind of stand?most dont have backs so you could climb partway in to shim the back.You could lay a few 2x4 on the floor lengthwise with the tank shim them level then put the stand on that.I dont like the foam idea cause Id always worry that it was retaining moisture against the wood.
Waiting will fill
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sully
Ancient Plus
Username: sully

Post Number: 8586
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 04:15 pm:       

heck 9almost typed that other word), just get a level and a ruler. see how much you are out of level over what length of distance. Get a 1 x 2 or 2 x 4, draw the line required. Get a saw and make a shim that works exactly as required for your tank. Don't need to wedge lots of little things. just cut two shims with the saw. be done in 10-15 minutes.
"I usually read the obituaries first. There is always the happy chance that one of them will make my day." -- Richard Ames
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dan
Moderator
Username: dan

Post Number: 6791
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 04:32 pm:       

setting a tank on a 'cushion' is designed for making up minor differences in an uneven surface of a stand top or tank bottom. significant differences in the stands contact with the floor are best handled with something more solid.
you're never too old to have a happy childhood.
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Joe C
Regular Member
Username: joe

Post Number: 329
Registered: 12-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:46 pm:       

How about foam on the tiles, topped with a piece of 1/2 or 3/4 inch plywood finished to match either the floor or the stand, and cut to match the size of the stand? That might create a good floor for you. You could dress up the edge of the plywood with molding if you wanted it to look better.
Remember to recycle...scrap your warships!
(USS Nathan Hale, SSBN 623, scrapped on April 5, 1994)
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sully
Ancient Plus
Username: sully

Post Number: 8595
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 10:56 pm:       

i am not sure i understand the foam?
"I usually read the obituaries first. There is always the happy chance that one of them will make my day." -- Richard Ames
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Joe C
Regular Member
Username: joe

Post Number: 331
Registered: 12-2005


Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:16 pm:       

It might not be necessary, but if the tiles are very uneven, the foam might help stabilize the plywood by filling the gaps. And although it didn't occur to me until now, it might also help protect the plywood from the inevitable water spills beneath an aquarium.
Remember to recycle...scrap your warships!
(USS Nathan Hale, SSBN 623, scrapped on April 5, 1994)
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flyingfish
Regular Member
Username: flyingfish

Post Number: 545
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 12:25 am:       

I am sorry but the 125 deserves the extra work. Rip out the tiles and do it right.
Filter and heater $80
65 gallon aquarium $280
Gazing at your Apistogramma for hours on end.....
PRICELESS!!!
Badman's Tropical Fish - Archives * Beginner Freshwater * Ways to support a 125 on uneven surface?       

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