Topics Topics        

Badman's Tropical Fish - Archives * Fish Health * I think my goldish is sick       


 

These questions and answers are for research or archival use only. There is a wealth of information here and I encourage you to search the areas. For the latest information and to join an active forum please click below.
Badman's message forum


Author Message
Top of PagePrevious PostNext PostBottom of Page Link To This Post

Candace Schefe
New Member
Username: csanchorage

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 10:23 pm:       

My little fantail shares an aquarium with a calico ruykin and a gold (feeder) fish and two Chinese algae eaters. They've been doing wonderfully well together for nearly three months. Now, all of a sudden, it seems like the fantail is floating to the top whenever he stops swimming. He looks a bit bloated, too. I called the pet shop and they suggested that I put a teaspoon of salt into the aquarium to help reduce the bacteria which may be making our little fantail sick. The aquarium is filtered and my husband is great about changing the water weekly. I am worried about the little fantail (Star) and his tank-mates, Calico, Nova and Fing1 and Fing2. Should I isolate Star from the others? Does it sound like he's going to die?

Thanks for your advice,
Candace
Top of PagePrevious PostNext PostBottom of Page Link To This Post

dan
Moderator
Username: dan

Post Number: 6703
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 03:08 am:       

what size is the aquarium these fish are in? have you tested the water for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate? when the water is changed, how much is removed and replaced?

while adding a little salt to the water will not harm the fish, neither will it have any positive effect whatsoever in the treatment of 'bacteria' or much of anything else your fish may have.

your fish 'may' have swim bladder problems. globoid-shaped fish like ornamental goldfish are predisposed to problems with the swim bladder because of their anatomy which result in mis-placement of the bladder in the body cavity. this can lead to food impactions, which in turn clog up the pneumocystic duct.

feeding dry foods which tend to take on water like a sponge and expand in the fish can result in food impactions. due to the swelling/expansion of food in the gut.

try feeding your fish a couple of peas. peas high fibre content can encourage destruction of any impaction which might be present. thereafter, ...

fast your fish for a couple of days. withhold all food for three or four days, and sometimes this alone will break up the impaction and return things to normal.

i'd try and find a product called Paragon II by Aquatronics® which 'may' aid in treatment of swim bladder disease.

get hold of Mardel's Maracyn-two or other broad-spectrum antiobiotic and use according to the directions.

from now on pre-soak flake or pelleted food before feeding them to your fish. this will allow expansion to occur prior to the fish eating it, and will lessen the chance of impaction.

while the above may help, understand that if your water quality is poor, you must correct that or nothing will help your fish.
you're never too old to have a happy childhood.
Top of PagePrevious PostNext PostBottom of Page Link To This Post

cindy
Ancient Plus
Username: cindy

Post Number: 9643
Registered: 05-2003


Posted on Tuesday, March 21, 2006 - 08:26 am:       

If it is an impaction, I have found fresh spinach will clear it out quicker than any other fresh food I've fed, and is a good thing to feed to all your GF a coupe times a week. Whether this one make it or not, you should be feeding fresh foods to your GF several times a week. Fresh spinach, romaine, spring greens, kale that has been nuked for a few seconds to soften it, zucchini slices, orange slices, etc. will keep their digestive trcts from impacting. I fed mine about 50% fresh foods and 50% pre-soaked foods. Brine shrimp and blood worms a couple times a week.

Without more info from you I will assume the tank is too small and the nitrates too high, another common culprit. Three GF and 2 CAE should be in at least a 29 gallon tank the first year, then a 55 the second, then an even larger tank or pond the rest of the 20+ years you will have them. Water changes/gravel vacs should be enough to keep the nitrates under 20 ppm at the worst, preferably <10 ppm. Keeping temps in the mid 70's, instead of colder, will help, too. Commons (feeders) do better at less than 70 degrees, and your CAe are tropical, and should be closer to 80, so I hope you have the tank at around 74-76 as it is. They would all do better if you kept the CW fish separate from the tropical fish.

Tell us more about your tank and water parameters.

"The only ones among you who will be really happy are those who will have sought and found how to serve." --- Albert Schweitzer

Top of PagePrevious PostNext PostBottom of Page Link To This Post

Candace Schefe
New Member
Username: csanchorage

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 02:12 pm:       

I just wanted to write and say thank you for the answers you gave to my dilemma. We removed Star from the tank and gave him a little spinach. He passed whatever it was that was "clogging" the pipes and no longer floats to the top of the water. From now on, we'll soak the food and try a bit of raw food with the fish flakes. My husband will check into the water issues mentioned. The fish are in a 10 gallon tank at present. We appreciate all the help provided through this board.
Top of PagePrevious PostNext PostBottom of Page Link To This Post

dan
Moderator
Username: dan

Post Number: 6736
Registered: 01-2003


Posted on Thursday, March 23, 2006 - 02:36 pm:       

glad your fish is doing better candace. i think however, that they're going to have further problems in a tank that small.

a fantail, a ruykin and a common feeder fish need a minimum of thirty gallons right now and as they grow (i'm assuming they're still quite small) they're going to need 60 or more gallons ... the common feeder can grow to over a foot long.

goldfish as you may be finding, are extremely messy fish and require large volumes of water in order to remain healthy. too, they should be maintained at lower temperatures than tropical fish such as chinese algae eaters. 65-70° as opposed to 78-80°. finally, if you actually have CAE's, they will as they grow, begin to harrass the goldfish and in fact attach to them in order to suck off their slime coat. generally, these are not good fish to have in any aquarium and in a cool water GF tank, definitely a bad idea.

you didn't respond to my question concerning whether you've tested the water for ammonia and nitrite? when the water is changed, how much is removed and replaced? i suspect that in a tank that small, these parameters may be higher than they should be (ZERO) and this in itself will lead to disease.
you're never too old to have a happy childhood.
Badman's Tropical Fish - Archives * Fish Health * I think my goldish is sick       

Quick Navigation Links

 

  Administration