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Ben Bramsen
New Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 09:47 pm:       

I've had Platys for a while, but never really cared enough. I always thought "If they eat their babies, that's just nature." But now I'm much more interested in it, I even brought a net for her to birth in. I know how to mate them and how to tell IF they're pregnant, but I don't know how long they're pregnancy lasts and when I know when to put them in the net. I know it's supposed to be about a day before they give birth, but how do I know when the day before they give birth is? I greatly appreciate any help you guys can offer me.
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Russell
Junior Member
Username: tboy

Post Number: 73
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 10:00 pm:       

It normaly takes about 3-4 weeks for them to give birth after they have been interduced to the male. In my experance they mate the first day they are together. To know the exact day is kind of hard. I normally move my plattys or guppies to another tank after 3 weeks or when you can really see ... hard to exsplaine I guess blackness at the back of there anal fin.

If you want to keep most of the babies I recommend putting them in another tank that is highly planted and lots of places to hide or get one of them breader containers. The nets i haven't had to much luck with because it means the mom and the babies are in such a close in area and well , she will just eat them all. :-)


But normaly in a communinty tank if you just let them have the babies a fair amount of them will live.
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Ben
New Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, January 10, 2006 - 10:04 pm:       

Yeah, I think she was pregnant when I got her, so I really have no idea. I just reloaded my fish tank this last week, so I've no clue when she got pregnant. Maybe I'll just have to wait until next time.

And I did some research with the breeder net before I bought it. From what I read, the mother doesn't eat for 24 hours after she birthed, so as long as I got her out of the net and back into the general tank in that time period, I hope it should be alright.
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 400
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 02:49 am:       

Hi Ben,

I've had platys for about the last 4 years--11 females, 3 momma-platys and 5 births with 6 fry surviving to adulthood & then some. Here's what I call my crash course in platy birth/care. I hope this helps.

Platy Birth/Care--The Crash Course

Usually breeding tanks and nets stress platys out, but if your girl is doing o.k. then you should be good. Just make sure you have some sort of spawning grass, Java Moss or a yarn spawning mop available for the fry to move into until you can "fish" their mom out & move her back to her usual tank.

Basic Platy midwifery:

Momma will eat her babies

Platys usually give birth early in the morning (it's something about their hormones synchronizing with the light of dawn)--so think sunrise.

She’ll give birth to between 6-20 fry.

Momma will eat less and act more lethargic just before the big day. (See more on this below under “Momma Care.”)

Fry care:

Make sure the little tank has a heater, too.

Filtration for the little tank--under-gravel or a sponge (esp. a sponge) filter is recommended so that the fry won't get sucked into a filter or otherwise traumatized.

Platy fry are friendly, curious and vulnerable. Java Moss is highly recommended even if they're the only ones in the mini tank. They really appreciate having somewhere to hide and sleep—since childhood and meeting your family can be exhausting. Java Moss, initially, can be a little pricy (running between $6-12 for a clump the size of a golf ball)--but it *really* pays for itself in what if offers the fish, it's an easy-to-care-for/thrives-well plant and since it reproduces itself well, so in time, you can sell a clump off of the original ball and re-coop your initial costs (or let it grow like crazy in your big tank—my tank’s starting to look like Ireland since I love it so well I’m letting it just grow and grow!)

You can feed the fry finely crushed flake food--whatever you're using for Momma will work fine for the kids. But there are also babyfoods at the petstore, too. A feeding ring can help keep the food contained so the kids have an easier time getting to it, too.

Water changes in the little tank can be done with a turkey baster and a bowl. The turkey baster is low-suction, but effective at getting up the muck at the bottom without sucking up a fry. And if you suck the wastewater into a bowl, you can check to see in case you did accidentally suck somebody up & return them to their siblings. Add freshwater back at a trickle so that you don't overwhelm the fry. Depending on how many fry you have, you can estimate about how often you’ll need to change the water. A small change weekly (proportionate to the size of the tank—like a 25% change, or so) would be a good idea.

It’ll take 1-1 ˝ months for the fry to grow big enough that they shouldn’t fit into anybody’s mouth in the big tank (then again, it depends on who is in the big tank—carnivores are the exception.) Within just a few weeks, though, you’ll start to be able to make out the fry’s eventual adult coloring/patterning—so that gives you another something exciting to look forward to. Lots of variety!

Platys can get pregnant at a very young age—such as 6-8 weeks old. By the same token, you generally can’t sex platys until they’re about 6 months old. Yep, it’s a sticky wicket An interesting side note, I have read where depending on the environment in which a platy fry is developing, their sex can be influenced by the hormones of the fish in the same tank where they develop. Platys are considered mature around 3-4 months of age, in most other ways except definite gender. (I’ll double-check on those ages for you.)

Momma care:

Momma’s behavior changes right around the birthday. She’ll probably be less interested in eating and will spend a lot of time resting until she’s ready to give birth. She’ll start swimming quickly and twisting about a bit during the delivery, after which, she’ll be tired and stressed out. While this is the best time to get her out of the tank if you don’t want her to eat any of her young, the poor girl is going to be tired and will need a place to rest/hide out when you move her back to the big tank. Keep a close eye on her in the next few days since she’s been through something rough and her health may be a little compromised. Most likely, she’ll be her usual, healthy self in a day or two.

Platys can store the sperm of up to, I believe, 6 different males at the same time. They can hold the sperm until they feel the environment is best for having kids. They’ll store the sperm as fertilized eggs and it takes one month for the eggs to develop into fully-formed fry that are ready to be given birth to. Mommas can give birth every month until they’re “empty.” (That probably sounds like a lot of fry, but if Momma gives birth in the main tank w/ Java Moss, you still might only have 1-5 fry survive each birthing.) This also means that every fry’s appearance/coloring/characteristics can be very different between batches of deliveries. Until you know who the daddy is, every one’s a surprise.

The gravid spot will fade back to the scales' normal shade…that is, until or unless she goes to give birth again (I like to think of it being a little like a pop-up turkey timer :-) )

Well, that’s about everything I can remember off the top of my head. I’ll check back soon with the other info. In the meantime, here are a few links to check out:

Live Bearing Fish Primer w/ Platys
http://www.atchison.com/fishinformation/breedinglivebearers.htm

Platy Gestation & Birth from Wet Web Media
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/FWSubWebIndex/platyreprofaqs.htm

Another Platy birth primer…
http://www.aquariumfish.nsinternet.com/platy.html
Platys

Badmans Beginners Guide to Platys
http://badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile4.html

Pandora’s Guide to Platys
(follow this link to TONS of platy pages)
http://fishpalace.org/X_maculatus.html

Aquaria Central Basic Platy page
http://www.aquariacentral.com/species/db.cgi?db=fresh&uid=default&ID=0563&view_r ecords=1

Live Bearing Fish Primer w/ Platys
http://www.atchison.com/fishinformation/breedinglivebearers.htm

Live Bearing Fish @ About.com
(see bottom of page for individual fish profiles)
http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/livebearers1/a/livebearingfish.htm
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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Ben
New Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 5
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 12:43 pm:       

Wow, thank you very much, Bunny. I think you pretty much answered every question I could have had. I greatly appreciate it.
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 401
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 02:12 pm:       

Anytime, Ben Enjoy your platys!

I forgot to mention that fry can survive well in their parents tank, so long as they have lots of hiding places. All but my first fry grew up in the same tank where their mothers lived, a 20 gal. with lots of plants and lots of Java Moss (in which they lived the first month or so of their lives.) It's surprising how many flake crumbs filter down to the moss just from the big fish eating their meals & this manages to be enough that the fry grow up healthy. Whether you can raise fry in the big tank depends on the mouth sizes of any fish living in there, but generally, raising fry in the main tank seems to be less stressful on the fish (and easier on you when it comes to filtration.) Just be careful when it comes to water changes--only change water off the top third of the tank. Fry hang out right against the gravel line, so vacuuming the gravel could result in vacuuming up your fry.
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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JP
Moderator
Username: jp

Post Number: 3253
Registered: 01-2003
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 04:55 pm:       

I'm starting to think that Bunny likes platies.
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Ben
New Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 6
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 - 05:46 pm:       

And I like bunnies, since that was my first love above fish. Coincidence?
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Ben
New Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 10
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 12, 2006 - 10:57 pm:       

So I've decided to not use my breeding net and let the fry fend for themselves.

But I'm wondering if she's going into labor soon. She's hanging out near the bottom and in the cover of rocks or plants. She's not really moving much, is rather lethargic. She's breathing heavily and moving her tail rapidly. Also, whenever the male comes near her, she freaks out and quickly swims away.

No other fish in my tank is acting differently, so am I right in assuming she's close? The only thing I'm worried about is how fast she's breathing. Is this normal?
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 408
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, January 16, 2006 - 04:05 am:       

Ben,

How's your platy doing? It sounded like she was just about to give birth.
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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Ben
Junior Member
Username: bennyb73

Post Number: 18
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, January 16, 2006 - 11:08 am:       

Unfortunately, she died, and I'm assuming that it was after she gave birth.

I tried making all of the conditions right for her while I was home. I went out of town for a night, came back home, and she was dead. Her belly was small again, though, and back to its lighter color. So I'm thinking, if any survived, that I'll have her legacy growing in my tank somewhere.
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 409
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Monday, January 16, 2006 - 03:14 pm:       

I'm so sorry to hear that, Ben. Hopefully her little ones are hiding out along the gravel line.
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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jacquie davidson
New Member
Username: jacquiedee

Post Number: 5
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 08:25 pm:       

Hi "Bunny",

I have 2 platys and she had given birth twice and 2 fry have survived happily! My question to you (as you seem very knowledgable when it comes to Platy behaviour) the female platy is displaying signs of bullying towards the male platy, especially during feeding. She does not like him eating and pokes him. He is slight in size and he tries to avoid her and I have paid extra attention to him when feeding bloodworms so he does get his share. Is this a mating behaviour? Would it benefit him to get a couple more platys? I worry in doing this yet as the 1 fry is still hiding in the plant and may get eaten. Your advise would be appreciated. I have a 10 gallon, with 2 Cory's and a Betta (but separated happily) Thanks!
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 412
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 08:12 pm:       

Hi Jacquie,

Sorry about the delay, but I just found your post.

Congratulations on your fry--how old are your little guys?

Your female sounds like she's a little queen bee, and that kind of pecking order is natural in platys. With only one other platy her size that she can pick on, your male's taking all the brunt of her ego (the poor guy!) When she has a little school of her own to reign over, she'll spread her bossiness out among them which will result in less stress, ultimately, for everybody.

Right now I'm seeing the same thing happening in the 10 gal. betta tank that I set up last week-- when the 3 girls are hungry, they wiggle and try bumping each other out of the way like little kids fighting over the last fudgesicle. So it seems to be a combination of the fish trying to establish a hierarchy (who's the big dog in the tank) and competing for the most happy-inducing thing to come from the outside world (which is food.) In most animal hierarchies, the animal with the highest status (whether it's a pack of dogs, a school of fish, or a tribe of humans) eats first and tries to get the most of the best food being offered. From my experience with platys, the boss fish usually remains the boss until they die and are succeeded by one of their fry that they raised and educated to be the next boss fish. The boss or alpha fish has a larger body than the other fish, relative to the gender of the fish (for instance, a female alpha platy among other females will be the biggest fish in the tank. A female alpha in a tank mixed with males and females will appear as large as a male or possibly a little larger, since females have more “depth” to their shapes and males are thinner and more stream-lined.) In a tank where there are a few adult platys but there aren’t any fry (such as when you get a few adult platys from the pet store,) the platys will challenge each other for a week or so until one fish emerges as the dominant fish. So what you tend to see in a tank with a handful of platys during feeding time is--the alpha fish feeds first, then the second most important fish and then all other fish come out to feed. In order to make sure that your little guy gets enough to eat; you can do one of a couple things…

Put at little food in 2 different spots in the tank (since your little female can’t be two places at once)

Or feed two different kinds of foods, such as alternating flakes and algae tablets (platies are voracious algae tablet eaters.)

Generally, your female can only eat so much and even though she’ll rush the food even when she’s full, your male (and even the fry as they get bigger) will get enough to eat using one of these strategies.

In terms of getting more fish…

I think I’d hold off on getting more platys for now. Platys like to keep a ratio of approximately 1 male per every 3-5 females. But that can lead to a very full tank very quickly, so you’d probably be best just sticking with the number of adults and fry you have now. In just a couple months you’ll have 4 adult platys in the tank, for a total of 7 fish (about 8” worth of platys, 4-6” worth of corys once they’re full grown, and about 3” worth of betta—esp. if it’s a male—so a total of aprox. 15-17” worth of fish) and that’s pretty full for a 10 gal. tank. Since it’s hard to guess right now whether the fry will turn out to be males or females, but you know you have at least one male in the tank with at least one fertile female, it’s safe to say you’ll probably have even more fry in the future. So it looks like you might want to think about branching off into another (or larger) tank in the future to handle the bioload of all those platys (esp. if your not considering adopting any fry out or trying to sell them to your local fish store.) In the meantime, you’ve done a wise thing by having the tank planted—that will help a lot with your biological filtration. Also, over time, the floss or sponge in your filter colonizes with bacteria (nitrosomas) which digest the ammonia in your tank and break it down into less harmful nitrates, which your plants then use for food. But if you’d like to make sure that your tank has enough nitrosomas to handle your increasing bioload, you can add some sort of media (like ceramic noodles, bio-balls or bio-stars) to either your filter or your tank to colonize it with additional bacteria (these are also nice should you start up a second tank as you can just move a few balls or stars from your older, cycled tank into the new tank and help the new tank cycle very quickly.)

Also, how do you have your tank set up with the divider? That can impact how your water is being filtered. Tank dividers allow water exchange between he two sides of a tank, but the filter can’t access and clean the water as efficiently as if the water were flowing freely (without a divider.) Over time, you’ll likely see a build up of a shiny film (which is protein) on the side of the tank that doesn’t have the filter on it. To amend this, you may want to switch the filter between the two sides during the week, or maybe pick up a nano filter for the betta’s side (even adding a 1” airstone to the betta’s side would help improve circulation a bit, but it won’t eliminate the protein film as well as switching the filter between sides or having a second small filter would.) Has somebody in the tank been picking on the betta? If not, your tank mates should get along pretty well without the divider. At one time I had a betta, a platy and a few neons in a 10 gal. and they got along very well. I also had 1 male betta and 1 cory as a setup a couple times and they always got on well. If you don’t think they’d fight, you might want to try removing the divider and seeing how everyone gets along. Hopefully, they’ll all get along beautifully.

Hopefully this hasn’t been too much information. Hopefully just enough to help!
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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jacquie davidson
New Member
Username: jacquiedee

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2006 - 03:15 pm:       

This is GREAT information and I really appreciate it! Yes, the female platy is certainly acting like the Queen Bee and her offspring, whom looks exactly like her, is doing really well about 1.5mths. The other little fry is still hiding around the plant and still very tiny. I do feel badly for the male platy who is slighter in size and yes I have fed in 2 different areas so he does get his share.

Yes I do have a divider in the tank for the Betta (I call him /Simon and am very fond of him due to his past ie: ending up in my garburetor and also the store he was bought from. I think it is sad them living in a cup??!!
I agree with you about the protein buildup as it use to be a clear view through and now it's not. I am concerned with releasing Simon with the others because of the fry. A fry got through the divider awhile back and I saw him eat it!....GULP...so fast.... I had no time to distract him. Otherwise I agree with you, that he would probably do well with maybe the exception of Miss Queen Bee herself??!! :-)
Is this protein buildup, harmful to any of the fish? I will look into a separate filtration idea like you suggested.
Again, I really appreciate your time and experience with answering my questions.

Best regards,
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 415
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2006 - 09:24 pm:       

Oops! Sorry, I forgot about the fry. You're right, keep them separated until the fry are at least 2 1/2 months old, by then they shouldn't fit into anybody's mouth. And by then even Miss Queen Bee should be so busy schooling her fry that she should leave Simon alone (heck, Simon and your little male might even become close friends.)

Since it isn't that far off, I don't think I'd worry about extra filtration. Everybody should do great if you can just switch the filter between the sides of the tank every other day or so. And the protein build up isn't harmful. In fact, you can wipe some of it off the surface of the water with a paper towel.

Also, in case you haven't heard yet, if you shop at Petsmart, go to their web page and print off an item description and price of what you want before you go shopping. It’s corporate policy that they have to give you the online price and this can save you tons in the long run. I don't know how long they'll do this for, but I hope it's a permanent thing. The store price is usually anywhere between 25% and 63% higher than the online price. Last week, I bought Hikari betta food and bloodworms and saved $1.20 on a $4.50 purchase. Last night I bought a small heater and a Penguin 100 filter and saved $21 by using the online ads (orig. price after taxes would've been $57 and I got both of them for $36.) This can really help in the long run, esp. with the cumulative cost of filters. (The stores don't accept print outs of online sale/bargain prices, only the regular online prices, but it still turns out to be a smoking deal.)

I'm with you on how sad it is that stores keep bettas in cups. April just posted a message about having bought a few new fish and the water from the store tanks that they came home in. She says the water tested at .25ppm for ammonia, so I can only imagine how high the ammonia must be in those tiny betta cups. Bettas are such resilient and friendly fish. Your Simon sounds like he’s living a dream by being a part of a whole 10 gal. family.

I like helping out whenever I can, so just post if you have any questions. I usually pop into Badmans every few days or so, and if I’m not here, one of the Ancients should have a good answer.

Take Care,
Bunny
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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jacquie davidson
New Member
Username: jacquiedee

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2006 - 10:37 pm:       

I hope I haven't been too hasty with what I have just done??!!
I introduced Simon to the whole tank and removed the divider. I had originally separated him because of the platys seemed to "gang up on him" and he remained hidden. Now that I have lost a platy and now have only 2 adults I figure it would be fine. I have been consumed with watching the activity in my tank! I have a "soft" spot for Simon as silly as they may sound and he has been on his own for so long. However, he was able to view the other fish and would "blow up" his gills and chase but of course could not get to them. WELL.... he is just doing that but it is (I hope) funny as he seems to be trying to show his dominance/strength and Miss Queen bee herself will have none of that! She is sniffing (okay dogs do that) Simon. Some time has passed and feeding was difficult as Miss Queen Bee (MQB) wants EVERYONES food. Simon is now settled and prefers the quiet side of the tank and the little baby Heysus (born Xmas day I think) tries to go near but is quick enough to skidaddle if need be. The father is no threat to anyone not even Simon. I think Simon senses she is MQB. He gets a little fidaddled when she does not run away from him. With regard to littliest fry still in the plant....well all I can do is hope it won't get eaten. I am pleased with removing the divider and I hope I didn't do it haste. I shall sleep on it and see in the morning if the community is okay. Thanks again and for the great tips from Petsmart. I am in Canada and do not think we have one(?) I shop at Big Als or Pet Smart.
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 416
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2006 - 04:12 am:       

Hi Jacquie,

It sounds like the big fish are going to work thing out among themselves and they should be o.k. You might want to experiment with feeding the fish at different times of the day and see which times Simon gets to eat the most. Then feed Simon a little extra during those times of the day. Thankfully, platys won't fin-nip, so once they decide on a pecking order everyone should get along fine.

Which platy did you loose? Your biggest fry? What kind of plant is your littlest one living in? If it's Java Moss, little Heysus might have a good chance of surviving in the big tank. Java is the key to raising fry in a community tank (I call my Java my "green gold" because it's so valuable just for that reason.) If he's any other kind of plant, you'd probably be best to get the little guy out of the big tank and into a tank of his own until the dominance struggle is figured out. Almost anything will do to move him into because he's so tiny--anything that's at least a gallon in size. To get him out of the 10 gal., move out the big fish first (since Heysus will be hard to catch and because if you scare Heysus from his hiding spot while the big fish are around, he could become a meal.) You'll need two small tanks or jars or buckets to do this.

First, move all the big fish into tank/jar/bucket #1.

Then move Heysus into tank/jar/bucket #2.

Then move all the big fish back into the 10 gal.

Then make sure Heysus has a little heater (a 50 watt heater will heat tanks up to 10 gal. A submersible heater would be great. The smaller the container you keep him in, the more closely you'll want to watch the temperature. I think Petsmart has some heaters that only cost about $6 with an online printout.) Keep his tank water in the 75-80 deg. range. He should be o.k. to move back into the big tank at about 3-4 months old. He'll grow about 1/2 to 1 mm per week, so by the time he's about 3 months old he should be about 1 1/2 cm--big enough not to fit into anybody's mouth. You don't have to worry about a filter for Heysus so long as you change at least 50% of his tank water once or twice during the week. I've used everything from a 1 1/2 gal. betta tank, to a 5 gal. plastic hardware store bucket to an old 1 gal. pickle jar rinsed out very, very well in which to raise fry. In a pinch, even a deep Tupperware bowl or drink pitcher will work to keep him in (although you'll want to either get another bowl or pitcher afterward or wash the bowl or pitcher really well with a drop of bleach before you use it again.)

Fry do most of their brave adventuring and moving around at night. Even then, they tend to hang out along the gravel line and hopefully all the fish are sleeping or at least groggy during that time.

Until you can move Heysus, keep the other fish *very* well fed.

I think Pet Smart and Petsmart are probably the same store. Here's what I found for Petsmart listings in Vancouver:
http://stores.petsmart.com/petsmart/cgi/selection?place=Vancouver%2c%20British%2 0Columbia&name=&option=&country=CA&design=default&lang=en&option=&mapid=NorthAme rica

Are any of these stores nearby?

It sounds like you're doing a great job balancing the needs of all your fish. With time, I think you'll become a real pro with platys.
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
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jacquie davidson
New Member
Username: jacquiedee

Post Number: 9
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2006 - 01:56 pm:       

Hi Bunny,

Well it is another day now and the activity in this tank is at the least interesting! Simon is definately "wanting" to be or is the dominant character with everyone with the exception of the male platy, he seems to leave him alone. He puffs up and chases the mother/female platy and larger (only) fry Heysus but the baby is very fast. Simon even went after for lack of a better term, one of the Cory's when it crossed (accidentally) its path. I believe that Simon is enjoying his new freedom but needs to learn how to live in a community in which he or I think the breed is not used to??!! I agree with you, that the adults will work things out (hopefully).

The platy I lost/died was one of my original adult sunburst and I was very sadden but I think that it was because of the mating the other 2 were doing perhaps and it died of loneliness (I know apparently fish have no feelings)??

I have not seen the little tiny fry near the Java or wood so I am suspecting that Simon ate it!! I'm sorry about that and I should have removed it yesterday to give it a chance. If indeed I do see it, I will follow your valuable instructions.

With regards to feeding; because I feed Simon betta pellets and flake for the others, is it okay if the platys eat a pellet?? The mother/female seems to eat everything?? I will try to feed at different times for all. Also, you are right about platys loving algae wafers....I think today is a good day to give them alittle.

Lastly, what are the chances now of her ever birthing again? What with the comotion with Simon in the tank now and her needing to swim away from him. I think Simon may be nipping her??

I hope ALL my questions are not bothering? You have no idea how much I value you helping me and the fish!

Best wishes.
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bunny
Regular Member
Username: moonbunny

Post Number: 419
Registered: 02-2003
Posted on Thursday, January 26, 2006 - 10:24 pm:       

Hi Jacquie,

Platys are the little goats of the fish tank--they'll eat nearly anything. So they're sure to appreciate the variety afforded by betta pellets (and, heck, with all the color enhancing ingredients in betta food, your platys should look amazing.)

There's a very good chance (probably about 100%) that your female will give birth again. There's even a good chance she may have more fry next month. My platys usually went about 28 days between birthings, give or take a few days. It seems like once they decide that an environment is conducive to fry survival, they'll happily deliver fry month after month.

Also, the Christmas 2005 edition of Practical Fishkeeping has a 2-page article called “Beat the Bully” on bullying in the aquarium. Their website has many nice features, too, including a searchable article database, fish profiles, tips for growing plants, product reviews, diseases/treatments and conversion calculators and more. Here’s the link to what’s in that issue: http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/pages/backissue.php?issue_id=64

I read the Christmas copy over a tea latte in the local bookstore earlier this week and it brought your situation to mind. The current issue came out on Jan. 25th, but there’s probably still a good chance that you can find the Christmas copy in the next day or so. If you can't find it in the stores, you can buy a past issue, but if you're only looking for the one story, you might want to post here on Badmans and see if someone can email the story to you.

It's so nice to hear that these posts are helping. Please write again if you have any questions and I'll do my best to find out the answers.

Take Care
"There is a natural hootchy-kootchy motion to a goldfish." ~Walt Disney
Badman's Tropical Fish - Archives * General Message Area * Archives * Archive through January 28, 2006 * How can I tell when my platy will give birth?       

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