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Water changes revisited

Badmans Tropical Fish Message Center: archive: Water changes revisited
  

Laura W.

Thursday, June 28, 2001 - 12:55 pm
This is partly continued from another thread with Joyce and weekly water changes. I just read the water change thread on the beginner and am wondering if we could continue it? Opinions ?
Weelky water changes or every two to three? Or is it again a matter of what works for you? In fact, we each have our own mini-environments because of differing water, tanks, fish, plants and so on!

  

Kick

Friday, June 29, 2001 - 08:42 am
That's right Laura. It is usually up to the individual and what is comfortable for them. Personally, with 7 tanks, I don't have the time to do weekly water changes. I usually try to get to them every 2 weeks, but sometimes it is almost 3 before it gets done. It appears my fish don't suffer in the least, my tanks are pretty good size and it is an enjoyment rather than a "job" for me (I have enough of those already...hehe). In smaller tanks, however, the weekly water changes will not hurt and probably is a good idea. Most of my tanks are about 30 gallons to give you an idea of the size.

  

Laura W.

Friday, June 29, 2001 - 11:21 am
Kick-
Good point- the size of your tank really does matter. I was wondering how everyone was keeping up with all those tanks everyone seems to have or will have!

  

joycedonley

Friday, June 29, 2001 - 05:28 pm
Laura I use a python to clean my tanks so things go a lot faster and easier. When it snows I may let my water changes go a little longer. I have my python going to the flower beds an lawn. Since we have a holding tank for the kitchen sink water I don't want to put lots of waste water down it.Currently with the nice weather I have gotten kind of nuts about it. I know everybody out there hates UG, but cross my heart I have never torn down the one in my 29gal. I do have TONS of java fern so maybe it is using up any extra waste. Also I did add the HOB. I have honestly only had one 4 year old african redeye die in that tank in about 1 1/2 years and I feel it was probably his time to go. Some of the fish in there have been living in it for 5 years! My two new ottos are okay too so far. Anyways I am definately not endorsing UG's at all and will never setup another tank with one, just wanted to add the info that you don't always have to break them down(Promise I will let you know if things ever change in the mucky tank).

 

 

  

marie6749

Friday, June 29, 2001 - 07:19 pm
I have a question about the python. I know how you use it to get water out of the tank, but do you use it to put water back in the tank? If so, how do you get the chlorine out of the water? I really appreciate you all. You are much help for us newbies!!!

  

joycedonley

Saturday, June 30, 2001 - 08:28 am
I know people who just add dechlorinator equal to the amount of water they are putting in the tank??? I myself use Reverse osmosis water, so I use the old bucket method to put the water back in. It still saves me a lot of time having the water emptied out and makes it easy to vacumn the tank!

  

Kick

Saturday, June 30, 2001 - 10:05 am
If you don't drain directly into the sink (which I have found is not as good idea as it makes the drain stink of fish poop), I make sure the tubing is drained of the old water, hook the python up to the sink faucet, make sure the water from the faucet is near the temp of the tank (I use a thermometer held under the water to see), flip the lever (do make sure the lever at the tank is turned off so that water will not immediately run out the other end....there is a chance the water pressure will make it "fly" out of the tank) and return to the tank to turn the lever there to fill. I just add my conditioner, salt water I have prepared and any other treatments directly to the tank and refill. It is that simple. I guess Joyce has to use the bucket method because of her RO criteria, but I have not used a bucket for water changes in about 3 years. Have all my tanks done, which is up to 8 now, in about 2 hours. Best thing I have ever used.

  

patgarverick

Saturday, June 30, 2001 - 01:11 pm
Kick, I am so glad you described how you use that python. I saw one ( I think that's what it was) at the fish store. Couldn't figure out how to get the chlorine out. Didn't occur to me to just go ahead and put the conditioner in the tank right before the refill. I'm currently using 3 construction buckets (and I was about to get another one to make things easier). About to go on vacation, but will try this python thing when I get back in two weeks. I think it will work for me since I don't have to use pre-treated RO water or marine salts.
By the way, is there anywhere on the site where you have a description of your various tanks?
-Pat

  

joycedonley

Saturday, June 30, 2001 - 01:39 pm
Pat make sure you have those levers set like Kick said. I was getting ready to do one of my 29 gal and hubby had it set for in not out. I almost doused the living room carpet with water from the outside tap! At least it would have been clean water.

  

Anonymous

Sunday, July 01, 2001 - 07:44 pm
I have a 29 gallon tropical fis tank, and my nitrie level is sky high, but my ammionia level is perfect. I have tries just about everything on the marketand hve done many water changes. I don't know what else to do? PLEASE HELP

  

jeff

Sunday, July 01, 2001 - 09:02 pm
hi anony person..we could help if I knew what you are asking?..is that high nitrite levels or nitrate levels?...and how long has your tank been up?...and what exactly are your readings?...sorry looks like a typo... get back to us OK.

  

Calvin

Wednesday, July 25, 2001 - 10:47 pm
Hi,
Currently in my living room is a 30 gallon tank with huge fish (8 inches), a 10 inch pleco, 2 larger silver dollars and a fruit tetra. Anyways we just bought the whole set up from a friend. I am testing the water, the ammonia, and nitrite levels are very low. However the Nitrate levels are sky high, 100 ppm according to testing. I have changed the water twice, nearly killing one silver dollar. What's Up? What is a good remedy?

  

joycedonley

Thursday, July 26, 2001 - 09:03 am
Test your tap water also and compare the two. Make sure you have correct readings and that your tap water is okay. Are you sure the tanks is cycled? Did you keep the filters wet when moving your fish and not rinse them in tap? How much water are you changing and is it the same temp as the tank water?

  

Calvin

Thursday, July 26, 2001 - 09:37 am
Really I have not tested my tap water for nitrate, figuring that would be ridiculous. The ph of the tap is very alkaline above a 7.4. The owners before said they used their tapwater, and tested the water in their tank and it was very alkaline. The undergound filter was maintained wet, the bio-wheel was not. I am changing 25% of the water each time and the temps are the same. Everything is go, the fish seem to be happy, just that nitrate problem scares me.
The tank is cycled.

  

joycedonley

Thursday, July 26, 2001 - 01:39 pm
Keeping a UG filter wet would NOT help since it is basically all plastic and only the gravel holds the bacteria bed. The biowheel having not been kept wet means there is no longer any beneficial bacteria on it and has to recycle. Also not sure what you mean by huge fish. The one plec is large, but is only one fish. Two silver dollars are also large, but only 2 large fish. We have to have specs to help you out.

  

Kick

Thursday, July 26, 2001 - 10:12 pm
Calvin, are the test kits you are using new or were they hand-me-downs along with the tank. There is the possibility that they have become outdated and need to be replaced. There is also the change that Joyce is right, that your tap water has high nitrates. If this is the case, call your water company to see what all they add to your water for purification.

Nitrates are not really all that harmful to fish, but such a high reading is not real good. You do want to see a small reading up to about 5 ppm to know that the tank is cycled. If the biowheel was not kept wet with tank water, I would imagine you have lost a major portion of your beneficial bacteria and it is trying to regroup. Nitrate is the end product of the nitrogren cycle, which I am sure you are aware. About the only thing I could possibly suggest is what you are doing right now with the water changes, but I would not change too much at a time. And I would test your tap water. Along with the water, you are also removing the bacteria that is probably trying to get this tank in order.

  

jeff

Friday, July 27, 2001 - 02:11 am
calvin yikes 100ppm! nitrates...ah like 5-10ppm good..over 50ppm bad!..at 100ppm your fish should be trying to get out of the tank!...as kick mentioned are you sure about your testing?..do that water change and get some better filtration..and what are you feeding these fish?

 

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