jay

transcript

  • [20:03 30/04/2004] <@craig> Good evening everyone!
  • [20:04 30/04/2004] <@craig> Welcome to this weeks Live! Fishchat!
  • [20:04 30/04/2004] <@craig> Tonight our guest speaker is one of Badmans very own, Russ..
  • [20:04 30/04/2004] <@craig> Russ, when ever you are ready, please begin.
  • [20:05 30/04/2004] <+russ> Good evening. As tonight's topic implies, we will be discussing feeding habits of tropical fish. Because fish are such a deverse group, it's not surprising that this deversity is reflected in their food habits.
  • [20:06 30/04/2004] <+russ> The more common aquarium fish (ones most likely found at your LFS) have been selected for fish-keeping, at least in part, for their flexible food habits. But a very important thing to remember is that there is no single food that will meet the needs of all species of fish at every stage of their life cycle.
  • [20:07 30/04/2004] <+russ> Also, there are very few speiceis of fish that can be categorized as strict carnivores (meat eaters) or herbivors (plant eaters). But, again, most species of aquarium fishes seem to be more or less omnivorous, requiring, or at least preferring, a wide viriety of animal and vegetable matter.
  • [20:08 30/04/2004] <+russ> Tonight I'll be discussing a more generalized classification, based largely on the method of feeding rather than on the items consumed.
  • [20:09 30/04/2004] <+russ> Fish that nibble at plants or pick at small plankton or benthic animals are called [grazers]. Many common fishes fit this group. Some examples are guppies and mollies. These generalized grazers feed on a wide viriety of plant and animal foods. Others, however can be very selective, such as some Loricarid catfish (Farlowella), that eat almost nothing in the wild except algea.
  • [20:10 30/04/2004] <+russ> Fish that concentrate planktonic plants or animals by straining the water are called [filter feeders]. These fish have finely spaced gill rakers which enable them to seperate food from the water efficiently. Other filter feeders use brushlike pharyngeal teeth to further concentrate or select foods. Many African cichlids are filter feeders.
  • [20:12 30/04/2004] <+russ> [Bottom feeders] or scavengers include some carps, loaches, sturgeon, and catfishes, which are able to to obtain nourishment from plant and animal debris and from animals that live in the sediment. Bottom feeders are more adapt to obtaining food this way due to their physiology (usually charactorized by their down-turned mouths), sensitive fleshy lips, and ventrally positioned sucking mouth parts.
  • [20:13 30/04/2004] <+russ> Barbels are a type of sensory appendage and are also common in many bottom feeders. Some even have taste buds in their abdominal skin. In the case of bottom feeders, the type of sediment influences feeding success.
  • [20:13 30/04/2004] <+russ> Soft sand and mud are easily procesed, but coarse bottom gravel can interfere with feeding. Sediments can make up 10-20% of the stomach contents of many bottom feeders and can carry nutrients in the form of fine particles that can also aid in digestion of algae or other foods.
  • [20:14 30/04/2004] <+russ> Only a small percentage of fish are totally [predatory], and some of these are adapted for preying on specific types of organisms. Aconstant supply of small fishes, worms, or plankton may be required to keep these type species well feed. Many predatory species can be trained to accept frozen foods or even dried diets. A species example is the South American Tiger Shovelnose Catfish.
  • [20:16 30/04/2004] <+russ> Several species of fish are [parasitic] and have eveloved into specialized feeders which feed on the body fluids, scales, or fins of other fishes. Some of these species have evloved to mimic the appearance of harmless fish. This type behavior allows the parasite to approach a host with less liklyhood of being recognized as a threat.
  • [20:17 30/04/2004] <+russ> So, now we have the basic feeding groups of our aquarium fish: Grazers, Filter Feeders, Bottom Feeders, Predatory, and Parasitic.
  • [20:18 30/04/2004] <+russ> Most species of fish can be eventually be trained to eat prepared diets, but not all diets are equally acceptable to all fish. Even the most nutricious diet cannot maintain a fish that fails to recognize the food. Recognition is affected by instinct and training. This brings us to the interactions of the feeding stimuli.
  • [20:19 30/04/2004] <+russ> There are certain factors which will motivate a fish to feed. Hunger, security, fish's state of health, temperature, water quality, and illumination, are all [motivational factors].
  • [20:20 30/04/2004] <+russ> Cyclical rhythms, including seasonal, reproductive, tidal and solar cycles can also control feeding activity in the wild which can persist in tank-raised fishes.
  • [20:20 30/04/2004] <+russ> When the fish's state of health is prime and several other motivational factors are in play, the fish should be then aquiring [basic stimuli factors] such as flavor, sound, and boyancy and color.
  • [20:21 30/04/2004] <+russ> Olfaction and taste are very important for most fish species and especially significant to the bottom feeders. Although there are specific anatomical receptors for taste and smell, flavors must first disslove in water before they are detected.
  • [20:22 30/04/2004] <+russ> Although some food ingredients stimulate a fish to feed, others actually act as a repellant. Certain amino acids and carboxylic acids have attractant properties. Sweets and fats are much less effective stimulants. Seafoods are especially strong attractants** (Sea foods, however, should not be fed as an inclusive diet)**
  • [20:24 30/04/2004] <+russ> Sound can be an effective feeding stimuli for many fishes also. Fishes that become trained to feeding on prepaired diets my recognize your footsteps approaching the tank and gather at the surface or near the front glass in anticipation of being feed.
  • [20:25 30/04/2004] <+russ> Sound recognition training of the fish may have started with food pellets hitting the surface of the water, which the fish then dirives the final basic stimuli. Boyancy and color.
  • [20:25 30/04/2004] <+russ> Sound recognition training of the fish may have started with food pellets hitting the surface of the water, which the fish then dirives the final basic stimuli. Boyancy and color.
  • [20:26 30/04/2004] <+russ> Fish adapted at feeding at the surface (Hatchet fish are a good example) may not pursue food that ventures past the mid section of the water column. Likewise, bottom feeders may not pursue boyant foods that float at the surface.
  • [20:29 30/04/2004] <+russ> Luckly for us hobbyists, most fish are not really that picky and I'm sure many of you have observed bottomfeeders in a feeding frenzy near the surface along with other classes of feeders.
  • [20:29 30/04/2004] <+russ> Shallow water species have very good color vision, and the food color can be an important stimulus. Lighter colored foods have been more successful in training fish to feed on prepaired diets. Other species have been observed accepting only green or red colored foods.
  • [20:30 30/04/2004] <+russ> Upon acting on a basic feeding stimli, fish utilize many different "clues" to detect and locate their food.
  • [20:31 30/04/2004] <+russ> [Detectional clues] utilized by some species are vibrations and changes in electrical fields.
  • [20:31 30/04/2004] <+russ> [Location clues] utilized by fishes are visual, chemical, and mechanical.
  • [20:32 30/04/2004] <+russ> In closing, here is a brief recap and overview: Feeding classes of fish are Grazers, Filter Feeders, Bottom Feeders, Predatory, and Parasitic.
  • [20:33 30/04/2004] <@craig> Russ, ready for questions?
  • [20:33 30/04/2004] <+russ> Motivational factors influencing the feeding habits of fish species include, hunger, security, state of health, temperature, water quality, and illumination.
  • [20:33 30/04/2004] <+russ> Fishes use vibrations and changes in electrical fields to detect foods, and visual, chemical, and mechanical clues to locate their foods.
  • [20:34 30/04/2004] <+russ> Selected reference(s) used: "Nutrient Requirements of Warm Water Fishes and Shellfishes", Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, US National Academy of Sciences.
  • [20:34 30/04/2004] <+russ> "Fish Anatomy, Physiology, and Nutrition", Tetra Press.
  • [20:35 30/04/2004] <+russ> I guess thats it for the topic of feeding habbits. I thank you for your time tonight in allowing me to present this.
  • [20:36 30/04/2004] <@craig> Russ, thank you fo your time..
  • [20:36 30/04/2004] <+russ> Your very welsome
  • [20:36 30/04/2004] <@craig> If you have a question for Russ, please type: /query craig I have a question
  • [20:38 30/04/2004] <+Gar> Ok..Can you tell me about the feeding habits of Corydoras
  • [20:39 30/04/2004] <+Gar> And if they will eat aquarium plants
  • [20:40 30/04/2004] <+russ> Gar, they are in the bottom feeder class and would ikewise feed in methods typical of bottom feeders. I have not read or personally observed any Corydoras species eating a portion of plant on purpose
  • [20:41 30/04/2004] <+russ> More...
  • [20:41 30/04/2004] <+Gar> Alright, thanks Russ
  • [20:41 30/04/2004] <+Gar> Oh, ok
  • [20:42 30/04/2004] <+russ> Their physiology does not allow them to expend extra energy going to the surface for food unless they are in dyer straights.
  • [20:42 30/04/2004] <@craig> Gar, please ask more if you wish,,
  • [20:43 30/04/2004] <+Gar> I'm done, thanks
  • [20:43 30/04/2004] <+Gar> Nice presentation by the way Russ
  • [20:43 30/04/2004] <+russ> thank you:-)
  • [20:43 30/04/2004] <@craig> Geoff..
  • [20:44 30/04/2004] <+Noname> Hey, I was wondering, with predatory species, I have heard of animals being "spoiled" after trying feeders and not going back to non live food, why is this, and would it be possible to make the fish eat packaged food again?
  • [20:46 30/04/2004] <+russ> Geoff...it would fall back on getting the fish motivated to feed on other foods...Hunger is a good motivator, if it does not interfere with the fish's state of health.....more..
  • [20:47 30/04/2004] <+russ> training the fish to recognize other edible foods using one or more of the 'clues' may also help
  • [20:48 30/04/2004] <+Noname> thank you, ^_^
  • [20:48 30/04/2004] <+russ> :-)
  • [20:48 30/04/2004] <@craig> Any other questions?
  • [20:49 30/04/2004] <@craig> Ready for the free for all Russ?
  • [20:49 30/04/2004] <+russ> I was saving the actual "nutrion' part for a future presentation ;-)
  • [20:49 30/04/2004] <@craig> I'll take that as a yes. ;-)
  • [20:49 30/04/2004] <+russ> sure, I hope I can keep up though :-)
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <@craig> The floor is open..
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <@Jessica> russ, awesome
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <Noname> Great job Russ ^_^
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <JP> Thanks russ. That was great.
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] * milk claps
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <+russ> Your very welcome
  • [20:50 30/04/2004] <NetMax> thanks Russ
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] * G hands Russ some Oreos
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] * +russ bows :-)
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] * Noname gives in and falls asleep.... so.....tired......, lol
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] <@Jessica> g'night geoff
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] <NetMax> i never could get my shovelnose to eat processed foods :(
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] <Noname> bye all, ^_^
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] <Gar> Nite
  • [20:51 30/04/2004] <+russ> Net, that is why I ckose that particular fish as a example of a tru predator :-)
  • [20:52 30/04/2004] <G> I think some of our Shovelnose at work may have eaten shrimp pellets before...
  • [20:52 30/04/2004] <G> or maybe not
  • [20:52 30/04/2004] <NetMax> I ended up keeping him in the goldfish feeder tank... a bit cold, but he was never so happy ;)
  • [20:53 30/04/2004] <+russ> Hikari carnavor tabs are a good way to start training many fish
  • [20:53 30/04/2004] <NetMax> esp. the arrowana sticks
  • [20:53 30/04/2004] <+russ> But, have to make sure you clean them up if they are not located and consumed in an hour or so
  • [20:54 30/04/2004] <NetMax> a lot of fish will never be commercially available because of their feeding patterns, is: filter feeders
  • [20:54 30/04/2004] <+russ> Net, yes, that is true of so many marine fishes. Yet these are still caught and sold......and doomed in the aquarium :-)
  • [20:54 30/04/2004] <NetMax> do you know of an which have adapted to aquariums, ie: cichlids from Africa?
  • [20:55 30/04/2004] <NetMax> *any*
  • [20:56 30/04/2004] <@Jessica> like tanganyikan and malawi?
  • [20:56 30/04/2004] <+russ> Net...Most collectable African cichlids have a long enough history of commercialization, that allows the offspring to adapt fairly well
  • [20:57 30/04/2004] <+russ> But...new species are still being discovered each month that may be questionable.. I can't think of one off-hand though at the moment
  • [20:58 30/04/2004] <NetMax> not mentioned, sand sifters, ie: Cytocara moori, but everytime I put them on sand, they ignore it, so it's been bred out of them
  • [20:58 30/04/2004] <+russ> If I tried to come up with a name, chances are it has been already renamed several times...lol
  • [20:59 30/04/2004] <+russ> yes, wild caught Moori can still be a little tricky, but wild caught ones seldom end up in a regular hobbyist's tank
  • [20:59 30/04/2004] <NetMax> lol, the longer you are in the trade, the worse it gets ;)
  • [21:00 30/04/2004] <+russ> I gave up five years ago, trying to keep up.. The ICZN is even farther behind....lol
  • [21:04 30/04/2004] <+russ> Well, I've got to break if there are no more questions at the moment. Thanks again for letting me present this to you.. I first presented this for a regional aquarium society about ten years ago. 99% still holds true today :-)
  • [21:04 30/04/2004] <NetMax> thanks again Russ
  • [21:05 30/04/2004] <G> thanks Russ
  • [21:05 30/04/2004] <@sam> fabulous job Russ :)
  • [21:06 30/04/2004] <@Jessica> russ, twas great :-D
  • [21:06 30/04/2004] <+russ> Take care, and hope to chat on "Nutrition" in the near future :-)
  • [21:06 30/04/2004] <+russ> Take care all...Net, it was nice meeting you.
  • [21:07 30/04/2004] <JP> Bye Russ. :)
  • [21:07 30/04/2004] <+russ> :-)
  • [21:07 30/04/2004] <Gar> Nighty Night Russ
  • [21:07 30/04/2004] <@Jessica> g'night russ


 

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